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Data Science Day @ Columbia University has ended
Columbia University’s Data Science Institute Presents:
DATA SCIENCE DAY

Authors/Collaborators are listed in alphabetical order.



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Demo [clear filter]
Wednesday, April 6
 

2:00pm EDT

1. Map of Demos and Posters

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

A Closed-Loop Brain-Computer Interface for Regulating Cognitive State During Dynamic Boundary Avoidance Tasks [D19]
Superior human performance in complex tasks such as piloting a modern jet fighter or driving a Formula 1 car requires goal-directed navigation while operating within narrow and dynamic physical constraints. a balancing act of maximizing task engagement while keeping autonomic stress response in check - a failure to do so can result in catastrophic accidents. The presented experimental setup represents a closed-loop brain-computer interface system that infers cognitive workload and provides feedback to achieve a reduction in task-induced arousal/stress with the aim to increase performance during high workload boundary avoidance tasks (BAT).

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Josef Faller

Josef Faller

Postdoctoral Research Scientist in Biomedical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Josef Faller received his B.Sc. and M.S. in Computer Science from Vienna University of Technology (2007, 2009) and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Graz University of Technology (2015). His research focuses on neuroimaging and brain machine interfaces.
avatar for Sameer Saproo

Sameer Saproo

Postdoctoral Research Scientist in Biomedical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Sameer Saproo received his B.E. in Information Technology from the Mumbai University (2003), his M.S. in Computer Science from the UC Irvine (2007), and Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuroscience from the UC San Diego (2012). His research focuses on neural information processing, neuroimaging... Read More →
avatar for Victor Shih

Victor Shih

PhD Candidate in Biomedical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Victor Shih received his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering from Duke University (2012) and his M.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Columbia University (2014). His research focuses on computational neural modelling, artificial intelligence, and... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Paul Sajda

Paul Sajda

Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Radiology (Physics) and Electrical Engineering, Columbia University
Paul Sajda received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from MIT (1989) and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania (1992, 1994). In 1994 he joined the David Sarnoff Research Center where he went on to become the Head of the Adaptive Image and Signal... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

A Unified Tool to Explore and Build Patient Cohorts [D16]
Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI) is an open, multi-stakeholder, interdisciplinary collaborative whose goal is to create and apply open-source large-scale data analytic solutions to leverage the value of observational health data to improve health care globally. OHDSI spans an international network of researchers and health databases worldwide and is centrally coordinated at Columbia University. Currently, with a goal to reach 1,000,000,000+ patient records, the growing network of collaborators consists of 100+ academic, industrial, and regulatory researchers.    This year, the OHDSI community is showcasing a new open-source tool called ATLAS. It is a web application that attempts to integrate features from various OHDSI applications into a single cohesive experience for researchers. It will enable researchers to quickly test hypotheses. ATLAS allows researchers to explore summary statistics on various OHDSI databases, search medical terminologies in order to define clinical concepts, and define and visualize cohorts of interests.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Karthik Natarajan

Karthik Natarajan

Assistant Professor of Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons
Dr. Karthik Natarajan is an Assistant Professor in the Department Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University Medical Center. He received his BS in computer science at the University of Texas at Austin. After working in the technology sector for some time, he went on to obtain his... Read More →
avatar for Mark Velez

Mark Velez

Clinical Research Programmer Analyst in Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons
TA

Taha Abdul-Basser

Program Analyst and Software Developer in Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Adler Perotte

Adler Perotte

Associate Research Scientist in Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons
Dr. Adler Perotte is an Associate Research Scientist in the Department of Biomedical Informatics. Dr. Perotte’s primary research area is the development and application of statistical machine learning methods, including probabilistic graphical models for biomedical informatics... Read More →
avatar for Sumitra Sengupta

Sumitra Sengupta

Associate Professor of Biomedical Informatics; Vice Chair of Biomedical Informatics; Director, NYP, Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University
Dr. Soumitra Sengupta is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University and leads a clinical information development team providing informatics services to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Additionally, he participates in technical and system architecture functions... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Agolo: The Future of Search [D7]
Users are inundated every day by an exponentially increasing amount of unstructured data in reports, filings, articles, social media, emails and chat. Agolo builds proprietary summarization technology for business intelligence that improves accuracy by 4x. Agolo transforms unstructured data into topical summaries at machine scale. Summarization is the first step in Agolo's mission to build a next generation search platform that goes beyond the 10 blue links.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Julian Norton

Julian Norton

Head of User Experience, Agolo
Julian Norton leads the user experience and design at Agolo. He uses both qualitative and quantitative research to guide product development. Working exclusively at technology focused-startups, Julian has a unique skill set of experience and interaction design. Julian focuses on identifying... Read More →
avatar for Prem Ganeshkumar

Prem Ganeshkumar

Natural Language Processing Engineer, Agolo
Prem leads the development of summarization technology at Agolo. Summarization is the first step in Agolo's mission to build a next generation enterprise search platform that goes beyond the 10 blue links.Prior to Agolo, Prem received a Master's in Computer Science from Columbia University... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
MA

Mohamed AlTantawy

Chief Technology Officer, Agolo


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

AMuSe: Large-scale WiFi Video Distribution [D34]
Currently, wireless video distribution cannot be provided in crowded venues due to limited resources. In our  recent papers we proposed AMuSe, a scalable system for WiFi multicast video delivery. The system includes a scheme for dynamic selection of a subset of the receivers as feedback nodes and a rate adaptation algorithm MuDRA that maximizes the channel utilization while meeting QoS requirements. We implemented AMuSe in the ORBIT testbed and evaluated its performance with 150-200 nodes. We present a dynamic web-based application that demonstrates the operation of AMuSe based on traces collected on the testbed in several experiments. The application allows to compare the performance of AMuSe with other multicast schemes and evaluate the performance of video delivery.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Craig Gutterman

Craig Gutterman

PhD Student in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Craig Gutterman graduated with B.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Rutgers University in May 2012 and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Columbia University in February 2014. He is currently working towards his Ph.D. at Columbia University. His interests include mobile... Read More →
avatar for Gil Zussman

Gil Zussman

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Gil Zussman received the B.Sc. degree in Industrial Engineering and Management and the B.A. degree in Economics (both summa cum laude) from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in 1995. He received the M.Sc. degree (summa cum laude) in Operations Research from Te... Read More →
avatar for Timothy Goodwin

Timothy Goodwin

Undergraduate Student in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Timothy Goodwin is a third year computer science major at Columbia Engineering. He is broadly interested in multimedia and communication technologies and has been pursuing these interests with the Wireless and Mobile Networking Laboratory. He is currently developing wireless feedback... Read More →
avatar for Varun Gupta

Varun Gupta

PhD Candidate in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Varun Gupta completed his undergraduate studies in Electrical Engineering at IIT Delhi and received his M.S. in Electrical Engineering at Columbia University in October 2012. He is currently working towards his Ph.D. at Columbia University. His research interests include network performance... Read More →
avatar for Yigal Bejerano

Yigal Bejerano

Member of Technical Staff, Mathematics of Networks and Systems Research Department, Bell Labs, Nokia
Throughout his professional life Bejerano has tried to combine applied and fundamental research in the fields of networking and algorithms. In Bell-Labs he had the privilege to work with many excellent researchers on various design, management and optimization problems in... Read More →



Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

An Introduction to Stan [D1]
"Stan had been successfully utilized in Pharma, Sports Analytics, Financial Econometrics, Publishing and other verticals.
The Stan project includes:
 (1) a computer language for users to model data with unprecedented flexibility
 (2) a variety of gradient-based algorithms to estimate the parameters of the model
 (3) a math library that supports auto-differentiation to calculate the gradients
 (4 interfaces from shells, R, Python, Julia, Matlab, and Stata
 (5) a webapp to visualize and diagnose the estimation output
 (6) a community of developers (mostly based at Columbia) and users all over the world.
Our demo will focus on estimating models that have been pre-compiled and made available through the R interface, including visualizing and diagnosing the output via the webapp and comparing the expected loss across models when predicting new data. Please see chapter 1 of
http://xcelab.net/rmpubs/rethinking/Statistical_Rethinking_sample.pdf
which is part of a recently-published textbook describing how to do data analysis using Stan.
"

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Alp Kucukelbir

Alp Kucukelbir

Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Data Science Institute
Alp Kucukelbir develops statistical machine learning algorithms and he uses probabilistic programming to develop scalable and robust inference techniques. He enjoys working on applications in structural biology. He is currently working with David Blei and collaborates... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Gelman

Andrew Gelman

Professor of Statistics and Political Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Andrew Gelman is a professor of statistics and political science and director of the Applied Statistics Center at Columbia University. He has received the Outstanding Statistical Application award from the American Statistical Association, the award for best article published in the... Read More →
avatar for Ben Goodrich

Ben Goodrich

Lecturer in the Discipline of Political Science, Columbia University
Ben Goodrich is a core developer of Stan, which is a collection of statistical software for Bayesian estimation of models, and is the maintainer of the corresponding rstan and rstanarm R packages. He teaches in the political science department and in the Quantitative Methods in the... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Lee

Daniel Lee

Staff Associate, Institute for Social and Economic Research
Daniel Lee is a statistical researcher affiliated with ASC, working for Andrew Gelman. Research includes new MCMC algorithms and applied Bayesian models.
avatar for Dustin Tran

Dustin Tran

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Dustin Tran is Ph.D. student in Computer Science at Columbia, where he is advised by David Blei and Andrew Gelman. He works in the fields of Bayesian statistics and machine learning and his research interests include general-purpose inference algorithms, Bayesian nonparametric... Read More →
avatar for Eric Novik

Eric Novik

Founder and CEO, Stan Group Inc.
Eric is founder and CEO of Stan Group Inc. , the company that is dedicated to spreading the joys of Bayesian modeling and the Stan language (mc-stan.org) to the masses. Prior to Stan Group, Eric was a Data Scientist at TIBCO Spotfire where he built statistical applications for... Read More →
avatar for Jonah Gabry

Jonah Gabry

Staff Associate, Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy
Jonah is a researcher in statistics affiliated with Columbia's Applied Statistics Center and working with Andrew Gelman and the Columbia Population Research Center. He also develops software tools for applied researchers as a member of the Stan Development Team.

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Bob Carpenter

Bob Carpenter

Associate Research Scientist, Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy
Bob Carpenter is a research scientist in computational statistics (Columbia University). He designed the Stan probabilistic programming language and is one of the Stan core developers. Bob has a Ph.D. in cognitive and computer science (University of Edinburgh), worked as a professor... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Bringing Large and Diverse Datasets to Mobile Devices for Public Education [D26]
Two Columbia University apps for the mobile smart phone and tablet (Earth Observer App and Polar Explorer: Sea Level App) offer interactive exploration of large earth and environmental datasets (terabytes) with the objective of providing an enhanced public understanding of regional and global climate change. The land and ocean surfaces and the atmosphere are updated monthly from satellite remote sensing.  The increase in the temperature of the ocean interior that drives thermal expansion and the rise of sea level and the flow of ice sheets on Antarctic and Greenland towards the coasts are visualized in yearly steps back to the 1960's. A finger tap anywhere in the imagery presents descriptive text. Earth Observer is designed as a topic driven atlas, whereas the user of Polar Explorer: Sea Level is guided to seek answers to questions. Currently the apps have about 100,000 users.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Bill Ryan

Bill Ryan

Special Research Scientist, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
avatar for David Porter

David Porter

Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
David Porter tudied atmospheric and oceanographic sciences and is interested in the interactions between Earth system components in the polar regions. His current research is focused on ice-ocean interaction in Greenland looking at glacier 'pairs' and what is causing them to behave... Read More →
avatar for Margie Turrin

Margie Turrin

Education Coordinator, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Margie Turrin is Education Coordinator at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory where she develops and runs science education projects for groups from informal community education, to K12 and undergraduate students. Her projects and publications range from engaging... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Andrew Goodwillie

Andrew Goodwillie

After a degree in geophysics from Durham (UK) and graduate work at Oxford, Andrew Goodwillie spent eight years at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where he continued working on his  research interests in lithospheric flexure using shipboard gravity and bathymetry, the construction... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Citizen Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring [D20]
A crowdsourcing-based, SHM-oriented smartphone application, namely, Citizen Sensors for SHM (CS4SHM) is demonstrated. The demonstration includes vibration measurement from a small-scale structural model, wireless data submission to the web server, and viewing the identification results online. CS4SHM enables users to collect vibration data from smartphone sensors, extract the time history in text format, and submit the data via a web view connected to an online server. The vibration time history received by the server is automatically processed from the time to the frequency domain via Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). In this way, the server determines the peak frequency and stores the results as well as the raw input data for further post-processing uses. Monitoring the modal identification results over time allows users to notice changes in dynamic characteristics of a structure.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Ekin Ozer

Ekin Ozer

PhD Candidate in Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia Engineering
Ekin Ozer got his BSc and MSc degrees from Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, in 2009 and 2012, respectively. He continues his studies as a PhD candidate in Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University.His research interests include... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Maria Q. Feng

Maria Q. Feng

Renwick Professor of Civil Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Maria Feng is Renwick Professor at the Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. Her research is on the forefront of multidisciplinary science and engineering in sensors, structural health monitoring, intelligent structures and system control for smart city applications... Read More →

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Computer Assisted Neighborhood Visual Assessment System (CANVAS) [D21]
CANVAS is a web-based tool for systematically and reliably assessing neighborhood built, pedestrian and road way conditions using Google Street View.  Neighborhood auditing (aka Systematic Social Observation), a research technique where trained auditors visit neighborhoods to collect observational data on street level built and social environment conditions, has long been used in urban sociology, social epidemiology,  planning and design research and traffic safety research.  However, the approach is quite expensive with travel time costing more than actual on the ground research time. CANVAS obviates the need for travel and provides a uniform and centralized means of conducting neighborhood audits across larger areas and with higher density of observations than can be achieved using in-person audit methods.   CANVAS allows a research method that previously was used on a boutique scale to be deployed on an industrial scale.  Research using CANVAS to understand pedestrian injury risk in NYC was recently published.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Andrew Rundle

Andrew Rundle

Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health
Dr. Rundle's research focuses on the determinants of sedentary lifestyles and obesity and the health related consequences of these conditions. Dr. Rundle Co-directs the Built Environment and Health Research Group (beh.columbia.edu), a trans-disciplinary team of researchers... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Gina Lovasi

Gina Lovasi

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health
Gina S. Lovasi is an assistant professor in Epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.  Her research examines how local policies and initiatives influence cardiovascular and respiratory health, seeking to understand whether the anticipated health benefits... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Mooney

Stephen Mooney

NIH Pre-Doctoral Cancer Training Fellow in Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health
Stephen Mooney is an epidemiology doctoral student at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.  His research interests include spatial analytic techniques, epidemiologic methods, and physical activity.
avatar for Kathryn Neckerman

Kathryn Neckerman

Senior Research Scientist, School of Social Work
Kathryn Neckerman is Associate Director of Columbia’s Health & Society Scholars Program. Neckerman is a sociologist who has conducted research on the role of race and ethnicity in urban labor markets, family structure, and education. She is the author of Schools Betrayed: Roots... Read More →
avatar for Julien Teitler

Julien Teitler

Associate Professor of Social Work and Sociology / Director of the Columbia University Social Indicators Survey Center., Department of Sociology, Columbia University
Julien Teitler is Associate Professor of Social Work and Sociology and Director of the Columbia University Social Indicators Survey Center. Teitler’s research focuses on the effects of social environments and policies on families and children, on health disparities, and on research methodology. Teitler teaches classes in Human Behavior and the Social Environment and in Research Methodology. Professor Teitler’s res... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Discovering Unwarranted Associations in Data-Driven Applications with the FairTest Testing Toolkit [D3]
In today’s data-driven world, programmers routinely incorporate user data into complex algorithms, heuristics, and application pipelines. While often beneficial, this practice can have unintended and detrimental consequences, such as the discriminatory effects identified in Staples’ online pricing algorithm and the racially offensive labels recently found in Google’s image tagger.    We argue that such effects are bugs that should be tested for and debugged in a manner similar to functionality, performance, and security bugs. We developed FairTest, a testing toolkit that detects unwarranted associations between an algorithm’s outputs (e.g., prices or labels) and user subpopulations, including protected groups (e.g., defined by race or gender). FairTest reports any statistically significant associations to programmers as potential bugs, ranked by their strength and likelihood of being unintentional, rather than necessary effects.    In the demo, we will show how FairTest can be used to identify unfair disparate impact, offensive labeling, and disparate rates of algorithmic error in data-driven applications. For example, we will show how FairTest can reveal subtle biases against older populations in the distribution of error in a real predictive health application, and offensive racial labeling in an image tagger akin to Google's. 

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Daniel Hsu

Daniel Hsu

Assistant Professor of Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Daniel Hsu is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and a member of the Data Science Institute, both at Columbia University. Previously, he was a postdoc at Microsoft Research New England, and the Departments of Statistics at Rutgers University and th... Read More →
avatar for Roxana Geambasu

Roxana Geambasu

Assistant Professor of Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Roxana Geambasu is an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at Columbia University. She is interested in computer systems in a broad sense, including distributed systems, the Web, security and privacy, operating systems, and databases. More specifically, her  current... Read More →
avatar for Vaggelis Atlidakis

Vaggelis Atlidakis

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Vaggelis is a Computer Science Ph.D. student at Columbia University in the city of New York. He is a member of the Software Systems Laboratory and his advisors are Roxana Geambasuand Jason Nieh. Before joining Columbia Vaggelis was a member of the European Organization for N... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

FindYou: A Personal Location Privacy Auditing Tool [D11]
Smartphones and apps provide us with extremely useful location-based services. When we use these services, we let the service providers know where we are and when we're there. This data can be used to infer many useful but potentially sensitive attributes of users. This work lets users import data collected about them from a few popular location-based services. They can visualize this data, and additionally see some basic inferences we make about them based on this data. This can be used as a location privacy audit system, where users can realize what they're letting the world know and take appropriate actions. Eventually, we hope to turn it into a system where users can donate their data to help us learn about the relationship between the demographics and the places people visit.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Christopher Riederer

Christopher Riederer

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
SH

Stephanie Huang

Undergraduate Student in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Augustin Chaintreau

Augustin Chaintreau

Assistant Professor of Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Augustin Chaintreau is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. His research, by experience in industry, is centered on real world impact and emerging computing trends, while his training, in mathematics and theoretical computer science, is focused on guiding principles. He... Read More →
DE

Daniel Echikson

Undergraduate Student in History, Columbia College

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

FlexICoN: A Self-Interference-Cancelling Full-Duplex Radio Enabling Next-Generation Wireless Communications [D33]
Full-duplex (FD) wireless is an emergent wireless communication paradigm that can greatly improve wireless network performance but is also fraught with fundamental challenges. FD operation involves simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency, resulting in the tremendous transmitter self-interference at the receiver input. This self-interference can be a billion times more powerful than the desired signal to be received. In this demo, an FD radio that consists of a software-defined radio, an analog self-interference cancellation circuitry, and a circulator with an antenna will be presented. We will demonstrate simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency channel with self-interference suppression across the antenna, analog, and digital domains to achieve cancellation with nearly one part-per-billion accuracy. This demo is part of the FlexICoN (http://flexicon.ee.columbia.edu/) project at Columbia University.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Jelena Marasevic

Jelena Marasevic

PhD Candidate in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Jelena Marasevic is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, under Professor Gil Zussman's advising. She graduated with the B.Sc. degree from University of Belgrade, School of Electrical Engineering, in 2011 and started her M.S./Ph.D. program at Columbia University right after. Her main research interests are in the area of combinatorial and stochastic network optimiza... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Grimwood

Nicole Grimwood

Undergraduate Student in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
avatar for Tingjun Chen

Tingjun Chen

PhD Candidate in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Tingjun Chen is second year Ph.D. Student in Electrical Engineering. He works at the Wim.Net Labwith Prof. Gil Zussman on algorithms, optimization, and implementation in wireless, sensor, and energy harvesting networks. He graduated with a B.Eng. degree in Electronic Engin... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Frequency-Translational Quadrature-Hybrid Receivers for Frequency-Agile Massive Carrier Aggregations [D28]
To accommodate the predicted 1000x data throughput growth in 5G communications, massive carrier aggregation (CA) is becoming one of the key technologies to boost system bandwidth.  Different regional spectrum policies lead to a large number of band combinations and challenge the conventional receiver architecture. Filter bank designs become extremely complex and costly. Thus, we demonstrate a new RF receiver architecture named frequency-translational quadrature-hybrid (FTQH) receivers for massive carrier aggregation. The FTQH receivers breaks the constraint between antenna impedance matching and the LNA input impedance by marrying design techniques of microwave circuits and CMOS analog IC. This facilitates the use of highly reflective LNAs and voltage domain wideband RF signal splitting. In this demo setup, three FTQH receivers are connected as an RF daisy chain to support as much as six-band downlink carrier aggregation. Six modulated signals are generated, received and analyzed in real time to demonstrate frequency-agile massive carrier aggregations. 

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Jianxun Zhu

Jianxun Zhu

MS Student in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Jianxun Zhu is a second year masters student of Columbia University, majored in Electrical Engineering. He is currently conducting research in Columbia Integrate System Laboratory (CISL) Kinget Group, under the guidance of Professor Peter Kinget... Read More →
avatar for Peter Kinget

Peter Kinget

Professor of Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Peter R. Kinget received an engineering degree in electrical and mechanical engineering and the Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium. He has worked in industrial research and development at Bell Laboratories, Broadcom, Celight and Multilink... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

HARVEST: A Longitudinal Patient Record Summarization System at the Point of Care [D24]
As more and more observations are recorded in patient records, providers face an overwhelming amount of complex data points, with little time for making sense of them all. This phenomenon of information overload has been observed in primary and specialty care, during hospital admissions, and in the emergency room. One of the promises of the electronic health record is to support clinicians at the point of care. Unfortunately, it seldom provides effective cognitive support. HARVEST is an interactive, problem-oriented patient record summarization system. It innovates in three ways: (i) it extracts content from the patient notes, where key clinical information resides; (ii) it aggregates and presents information from multiple care settings, including inpatient, ambulatory, and emergency department encounters; and (iii) it is integrated into the electronic health record at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Marc Sturm

Marc Sturm

IT Director, New-York Presbyterian Hospital
I am an IT Director at NYP Data Analytics team. I have been working in IT for over 20 years, and in Health Care for over 10 years. I am responsible of the Big Data and Data Science project at the hospital.
avatar for Sharon Lipsky Gorman

Sharon Lipsky Gorman

Programmer Analyst in Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons
Sharon works for the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University. She is one of the core developers and designers of HARVEST, a longitudinal patient record summarization system for supporting clinicians at the point of care. Her research interests include data visualization... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Noemie Elhadad

Noemie Elhadad

Associate Professor of Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons
Prof. Elhadad's research is in biomedical informatics, natural language processing, and data mining. She develops techniques that aim to support clinicians, patients, and health researchers in their information workflow by automatically extracting and making accessible information... Read More →

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Heisenbyte: Thwarting Memory Disclosure Attacks using Destructive Code Reads [D4]
Vulnerabilities that disclose executable memory pages en- able a new class of powerful code reuse attacks that build the attack payload at runtime. In this work, we present Heisenbyte, a system to protect against memory disclosure attacks. Central to Heisenbyte is the concept of destructive code reads – code is garbled right after it is read. Garbling the code after reading it takes away from the attacker her ability to leverage memory disclosure bugs in both static code and dynamically generated just-in-time code. By leveraging existing virtualization support, Heisenbyte’s novel use of destructive code reads sidesteps the problem of incomplete binary disassembly in binaries, and extends protection to close-sourced COTS binaries, which are two major limitations of prior solutions against memory disclosure vulnerabilities. Our experiments demonstrate that Heisenbyte can tolerate some degree of imperfect static analysis in disassembled binaries, while effectively thwarting dynamic code reuse exploits in both static and JIT code, at a modest 1.8% average runtime overhead due to virtualization and 16.5% average overhead due to the destructive code reads.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Adrian Tang

Adrian Tang

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia University
Adrian is a PhD student who joined the IDS Lab in Fall 2012. His interests include vulnerability research, malware analysis and detection. He is currently researching in hardware-oriented techniques to detect malware attacks

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Simha Sethumadhavan

Simha Sethumadhavan

Associate Professor of Computer Science, Columbia University
Simha Sethumadhavan is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Columbia Engineering. He is the founding director of the Computer Architecture and Security Technologies Lab (CASTL) at Columbia University. Sethumadhavan’s research interests are in hardware security, hardware... Read More →
avatar for Salvatore Stolfo

Salvatore Stolfo

Professor of Computer Science, Columbia University
Salvatore J. Stolfo is Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. from NYU Courant Institute in 1979 and has been on the faculty of Columbia ever since. He won an IBM Faculty Development Award early in his academic career in 1983. He has published... Read More →

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

How Technology Harnesses Science and Data to Give Answers to Decision-Makers [D22]
Global risk of rainfall-related disasters? How El Niño impacts rainfall globally? Risk of malaria in Africa? Risk of famine in the Philippines? Rice production risk in Bicol, the Philippines? Risk of fire in Indonesia? How will seasonal rainfall shift in the upcoming seasons globally? What matters: global warming or year-to-year variability?   So many questions, one answer: the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) Data Library (DL) and Maprooms. Get the answers to those questions (and more) for yourself by surfing the IRI Maprooms. Tailor your analysis and generate maps and graphs online, on the fly. An IRI DL expert will facilitate your exploration by telling you how technology enables the harnessing of science and data to deliver information to decision-makers. And, why not, start your own program online to make your own analysis of one or more of the hundreds datasets available in the DL.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for John del Corral

John del Corral

Senior Staff Associate, Earth Institute, The International Research Institute for Climate and Society
After receiving his computer science degree from the Univ. of Colorado in 1983, John del Corral joined the EPA-funded Acid Deposition Modeling Project, headed by Julius Chang, at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He participated in the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM... Read More →
avatar for Michael Bell

Michael Bell

Senior Staff Associate, Earth Institute, The International Research Institute for Climate and Society
Michael Bell studied meteorology at the University of Oklahoma and graduated with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in 1994 and 2001, respectively. His master’s work involved the study of the decadal and interannual variability of West African rainfall disturbance lines. He joined... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Hybrid Analog-Digital Computing for Solving Nonlinear Systems [D32]
"Due to the anticipated slowdown of speed and efficiency improvements in integrated circuits, researchers are looking for new scalable ways to get useful computation with existing silicon technology. Our work explores using analog electronic circuits to assist conventional digital computers to obtain high performance and low energy computation.
Our prototype analog co-processor solves nonlinear and linear systems of equations, delivering approximate solutions which are useful in physical simulations and machine learning tasks. Commonly perceived downsides of analog computing, such as low precision and accuracy, limited problem sizes, and difficulty in programming are all compensated for using methods we discuss. Based on our findings, small-scale uses of analog computing can bring efficient physics simulation to energy-efficient, Internet-of-Things devices. On the other hand, large-scale uses of analog computing can speed up the training of machine learning applications.
"

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Yipeng Huang

Yipeng Huang

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Yipeng is a fifth year PhD student in computer science. Yipeng Huang received the B.S. degree in computer engineering in 2011, and M.S. and M.Phil. degrees in computer science in 2013 and 2015, respectively, all from Columbia University. He previously worked at Boeing, in the... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Ning Guo

Ning Guo

PhD Candidate in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Ning Guo is a 4th-year PhD student,  supervised by Prof. Yannis Tsividis, at Electrical Engineering DepartmentColumbia University. His research interests include ultra low-power analog/mixed-signal circuit design, analog/hybrid computing, energy-efficient embedded computing, continuous-time computing... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Idea Generation, Creativity, and Prototypicality [D13]
Please note that this demo will only be available until 3:45PM.

We explore the use of Big Data tools to shed new light on the idea generation process, automatically “read” ideas in order to identify promising ones, and help people be more creative. The literature suggests that creativity results from the optimal balance between novelty and familiarity, which should be measured based on the combinations of words in an idea. We build semantic networks where nodes represent word stems relevant to a particular idea generation topic, and edge weights capture the novelty vs. familiarity of word stem combinations (i.e., the weight of an edge that connects two word stems measures their scaled co-occurrence). Each idea contains a set of word stems, which form a semantic subnetwork. The edge weight distribution in that subnetwork reflects how the idea balances novelty with familiarity. Consistent with the “beauty in averageness” effect, we find that ideas with semantic subnetworks that have a more prototypical edge weight distribution are judged as more creative. Practically, we demonstrate how our research can be used to automatically identify promising ideas, and recommend words to users on the fly to help them improve their ideas.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Oded Netzer

Oded Netzer

Associate Professor of Business, Columbia Business School
Professor Netzer's research centers on one of the major business challenges of the data-rich environment of the 21st century: developing quantitative methods that leverage data to gain a deeper understanding of customer behavior and guide firms' decisions. He focuses primarily on... Read More →
avatar for Olivier Toubia

Olivier Toubia

Glaubinger Professor of Business, Columbia Business School
Olivier Toubia is the Glaubinger Professor of Business and the Faculty Director of the Lang Center for Entrepreneurship at Columbia Business School. His research focuses on various aspects of innovation (including idea generation, preference measurement, and the diffusion of innovation... Read More →



Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Mapping Tibetan Monasteries [D10]
This project is a new attempt to combine Tibetan studies and digital humanity by utilizing GIS technology. Tibet is known for its diverse and splendid monastic traditions with a long history, and the primary goal of this project is visualizing the development of Tibetan monasteries from the 9th to 21th centuries. By collecting the information of 2,733 monasteries in Tibet, our work team built a database of Tibetan monasteries and further visualized the development of Tibetan monasteries for 1,200 years as a GIS map with timeline tool. Moreover, our team produced different theme maps of Tibetan monastic cultures, such as the affiliations of monasteries the clusters of livestocks. In addition to visualizing the big data by GIS technology, we analyzed the patterns of Tibetan monasteries and presented our work on Columbia Wikischolars. We strongly hope to participate in "2016 Data Science Day @ CU" in order to have more people access fascinating Tibetan culture through digital humanity.  

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Ling-Wei Kung

Ling-Wei Kung

PhD Candidate in East Asian Languages and Cultures, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Ling-wei Kung is a Ph.D. student in Sino-Tibetan history. His research focuses on transregional legal practices and economic exchanges among Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang and late imperial China. He is also more broadly interested in the history of Inner Asian peoples between the Qing... Read More →
QQ

Qichen Qian

MA Student in East Asian Languages and Cultures, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
avatar for Tongtong Zhu

Tongtong Zhu

Graduate Student, East Asian Languages and Cultures
XX

Xiaoze Xu

MA Student in East Asian Languages and Cultures, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences



Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Mobile Phone Based Systematic Street Observations and Geotagged Photos to Identify Vector Control Opportunities in Informal Communities [D17]
Rio das Pedras, home to approximately 63,500 residents, is the third largest informal community in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A tightly woven community, Rio das Pedras has continually attracted new residents while developing a growing local economy. Despite the collective successes, some services and infrastructure that many developed areas take for granted are missing in Rio das Pedras.    The team used the Fulcrum platform, a mobile data collection tool, to deploy a customized structured questionnaire and map layer of Rio das Pedras in order to conduct a neighborhood audit of the area. The app allowed the team to coordinate the collection photographic and location data in real time.  The project coordinator and two data collectors were able to collect SSO data at 643 locations (86% of all street segments) in Rio das Pedras, essentially collecting a saturated sample across the entire community.      More than 4,000 geotagged photos have subsequently been used to create themed photo collages, and visuals of random 5% sample of the street segments observed.  These photos have also been used to illustrate a community health profile produced for distribution to local residents and stakeholders.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Andrew Rundle

Andrew Rundle

Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health
Dr. Rundle's research focuses on the determinants of sedentary lifestyles and obesity and the health related consequences of these conditions. Dr. Rundle Co-directs the Built Environment and Health Research Group (beh.columbia.edu), a trans-disciplinary team of researchers... Read More →
avatar for Gina Lovasi

Gina Lovasi

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health
Gina S. Lovasi is an assistant professor in Epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.  Her research examines how local policies and initiatives influence cardiovascular and respiratory health, seeking to understand whether the anticipated health benefits... Read More →
avatar for Richa Gupta

Richa Gupta

Graduate Student in Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health
avatar for Richard V. Remigio

Richard V. Remigio

Ph.D. Candidate in Environmental Health Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Richard Remigio is a PhD candidate in the Climate and Health Program. Prior to starting his doctoral studies, he worked as an environmental engineer for the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) working broadly on water quality protection at the national scale. His primary research... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Gustavo S. Azenha

Gustavo S. Azenha

Associate Research Scholar, Institute of Latin American Studies
Gustavo S. Azenha received his M.S. and Ph.D. from Cornell University,with an interdisciplinary background in the biology and social sciences (sociocultural anthropology & development sociology).  Gustavo's primary disciplinary expertise is development anthropology with a thematic... Read More →
avatar for Melika Ranjbar Behrooz

Melika Ranjbar Behrooz

Undergraduate Student in Urban Studies, Barnard College
Melika Behrooz is a third-year student at Barnard College, majoring in Urban Studies and focusing in Public Health. She is currently working within a research group led by Professor Gina Lovasi, focusing on an urbanizing favela outside of Rio. She has also been working with Professor... Read More →
MC

Marilia Carvalho

Brazilian National School of Public Health at FioCruz
avatar for Folake Eniola

Folake Eniola

PhD Candidate in Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health
avatar for Sandro Galea

Sandro Galea

Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health
Sandro Galea, MD, MPH, DrPH, is a physician and an epidemiologist. Dr. Galea is interested in the social production of health of urban populations. His work explores innovative cells-to-society approaches to population health questions. His primary focus is on the causes of brain... Read More →
avatar for Daniel M. Sheehan

Daniel M. Sheehan

Member of the Built Environment and Health Project (BEH), Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University
Daniel M. Sheehan is a member of the Built Environment and Health Project (BEH) research group at Columbia University's Department of Epidemiology where he builds and processes geospatial databases for environmental health-related projects. He earned his MA in GIS from University... Read More →

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

MoMA Through Time [D8]
With MoMA Through Time, we explore the rich exhibition history of the Museum of the Modern Art (MoMA) using the exhibition dataset provided by the museum. So far, it looks at the most popular artists’ exhibition frequencies at the museum, as well as exploring how different countries and movements are represented at the museum throughout its existence. This project was originally created for "MoMA Untitled: Art Datathon," hosted by the museum and was the overall winner for the event.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Manuel Rueda

Manuel Rueda

MS Student in Data Science, Data Science Institute
Manuel Rueda is a M.S. student in Data Science at Columbia University. He received his B.S. in Economics in 2010 from ITESM (Mexico), after which he worked for 5 years on big data analysis for financial risk management. His main interests include machine learning, social data and... Read More →
avatar for Woojin Kim

Woojin Kim

MS Student in Data Science, Data Science Institute
Woojin Kim received his BS degree in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University in 2012 and MS degree in Chemical Engineering from Columbia University in 2013. He is currently pursuing a MS degree in Data Science at Columbia University. His interests include machine learning / data... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Nomaduma Masilela

Nomaduma Masilela

Fellow at The Museum of Modern Art, The Museum of Modern Art
Nomaduma Masilela is a second-year PhD candidate who studies modern and contemporary art from Africa and the Diaspora. She is a Ford Pre-Doctoral Fellow and a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow.Nomaduma received her BA from Barnard College (2007). She was a Curatorial Fellow at The... Read More →

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Monitoring Large Scale Disasters [D23]
During crises such as natural disasters or other human tragedies, information   needs of both civilians and responders often require urgent, specialized   treatment. Monitoring and summarizing important information during such an   event remains a difficult problem. We present a system for monitoring online   news for such disasters. Given a query: e.g. "Hurricane Sandy," our system   analyzes the web, and produces a sequence of updates, brief textual   descriptions about the current state of the event, as that event unfolds   over time.    We use novel, disaster-specific features for generating updates,    including geo-locations and language models representing the language of    disaster.   Our demo will allow users to see updates generated for   pre-run queries including: Hurricane Sandy, the Boston Marathon bombing,   and 40 other large scale disasters. A work-in-progress demo can be seen at the   url listed. 

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Chris Kedzie

Chris Kedzie

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Kathy McKeown

Kathy McKeown

Director, Data Science Institute
A leading scholar and researcher in the field of natural language processing, McKeown focuses her research on big data; her interests include text summarization, question answering, natural language generation, multimedia explanation, digital libraries, and multilingual applications. Her research group's Columbia Newsblaster, which has been live since 2001, is... Read More →

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Personalized Compass--A Compact Visualization for Direction and Location [D29]
Maps on mobile/wearable devices often make it difficult to determine the location of a point of interest (POI). For example, a POI may exist outside the map or on a background with no meaningful cues. To address this issue, we present Personalized Compass, a self-contained compact graphical location indicator. Personalized Compass uses personal a priori POIs to establish a reference frame, within which a POI in question can then be localized. Graphically, a personalized compass combines a multi-needle compass with an abstract overview map. In this demonstration, we present a prototype iOS map application with Personalized Compass. Attendees will have the opportunities to interactively use Personalized Compass to perform a series of map-based location and direction tasks.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Daniel Miau

Daniel Miau

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
avatar for Steven Feiner

Steven Feiner

Professor of Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Steven Feiner is professor of computer science at Columbia Engineering, where he directs the Computer Graphics and User Interfaces Lab and co-directs the Columbia Vision and Graphics Center. His interests include human–computer interaction, augmented reality and virtual environments... Read More →



Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

QuantMiner for Mining Quantitative Association Rules [D12]
We present QuantMiner, a Data Mining tool for mining Quantitative Association Rules that is taking into consideration numerical attributes in the mining process without a binning/discretization a priori of the data. It exploits a recent and innovative research in using genetic algorithms for mining quantitative rules published in IJCAI 2007.   The system is based on a genetic algorithm that dynamically discovers “good” intervals in association rules by optimizing both the support and the confidence of the rules. The experiments on real and artificial databases have shown the usefulness of QuantMiner as an interactive, exploratory data-mining tool.    The software was published in the Journal of Machine Learning Research open source software.  http://jmlr.org/papers/v14/salleb-aouissi13a.html 

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Ansaf Salleb-Aouissi

Ansaf Salleb-Aouissi

Lecturer in the Discipline of Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Ansaf Salleb-Aouissi joined the Department of Computer Science as a Lecturer in Discipline in July 2015. Ansaf received her PhD in Computer Science from University of Orleans, France in 2003, after which she pursued her training as a postdoctoral fellow at INRIA, Rennes (France). She... Read More →
avatar for Antonio Moretti

Antonio Moretti

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Real Time Cyber Risk Pricing Model [D5]
Using a network of virtual machines, this model demonstrates the frequency and severity of security breaches. The data gathered in this environment is then used to price cyber risk based on the cost to remediate, the length of the breach and the likelihood of future breaches.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Robert Terrin

Robert Terrin

MBA Candidate, Columbia Business School


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

RObotic Spine Exoskeleton (ROSE) [D14]
The ROSE Brace is designed to first understand spinal deformities, such as scoliosis.  With that knowledge it can then be used to develop novel treatment protocols or methods of diagnosis.  This is done through the use of multiple segments which can push or bend different portions of the torso to move the underlying spine.  This allows the wearer to move on their own while still receiving forces from the brace.

Speakers
avatar for Sunil Agrawal

Sunil Agrawal

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, Columbia Engineering
Dr. Agrawal obtained a PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 1990 with emphasis on robotics, dynamics, and control. He currently directs the Robotics and Rehabilitation Laboratory (ROAR) and Robotic Systems Engineering Laboratory (ROSE), which have... Read More →

Demo/Poster Presenter
JP

Joon Park

PhD Student in Mechanical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
avatar for Paul Stegall

Paul Stegall

PhD Candidate in Mechanical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Paul received the B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA, in 2009. He is currently working towards the Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering at Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. He is with the Robotics and Rehabilitation Laboratory... Read More →
avatar for Riancy Li

Riancy Li

Undergraduate Student in Mechanical Engineering, Columbia Engineering

Demo/Poster Collaborator
RM

Rosemarie Murray

Undergraduate Student in Mechanical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
HZ

Haohan Zhang

Research Assistant, Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Scalable Platform for Efficient Embedded Big-Data Processing [D31]
The quest for energy efficiency affects all types of computer systems, from data centers to embedded devices. As the amount of sensor-generated data continues to grow, their processing by analytics applications is increasingly pushed to the  edge of the cloud. The demand for efficient embedded big-data processing translates in the emergence of heterogeneous architectures, which combine accelerators with general-purpose processors. Heterogeneity, however, exacerbates design and programming complexity. We propose a system-level design methodology that is scalable and application-driven. It relies on a flexible architecture balancing heterogeneity and regularity to ease the integration of accelerators and processors. It promotes intellectual property reuse and enables quick design-space exploration at both the component and application levels. Furthermore, it addresses the challenges of running legacy software and managing energy in accelerator-enhanced architectures. We demonstrate our methodology with a computer-vision application integrated with a real-time monitoring mechanism implemented on a high-end FPGA prototyping system. 

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Davide Giri

Davide Giri

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
avatar for Emilio Cota

Emilio Cota

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Emilio is a PhD student in the System Level Design Group, led by prof. Luca Carloni. His research interests are computer architecture and systems software. Emilio is currently working on a scalable simulator for many-core heterogeneous machines, that is, machines that integrate large... Read More →
avatar for Paolo Mantovani

Paolo Mantovani

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Paolo is a PhD student at Columbia University working with the System-Level-Design group under the supervision of Professor Luca Carloni. He  completed his M.S. degree in Electronic Engineering at "Politecnico di Torino" in 2010 and earned his  piano diploma at the Conservatory... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Luca Carloni

Luca Carloni

Associate Professor of Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
Luca Carloni is an associate professor of computer science at Columbia Engineering. He received a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation in 2006, was selected as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in 2008, and received the Office of... Read More →
avatar for Giuseppe Di Guglielmo

Giuseppe Di Guglielmo

Associate Research Scientist in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Scopio - An Intelligent Social Media Content Curation and Rights Management Platform [D9]
Scopio is a premier platform that licenses trending images and videos on social media, curated specifically to suit clients needs.  It processes millions of  user generated content (UGC) contributed by users across multiple social media platforms, identifies the most appropriate content for a client, and procures the rights for that content to be legally used by the client.    It employs a set of complex algorithms to process the social media streams like Twitter and Instagram, to filter out unwanted content, then uses a mix of smart vision based categorization system as well as manual verification to make sure that the content is curated as per the client's needs.  It then provides a dashboard for customers to reach out to the content contributors, obtain the rights for that content, which then can be used legally for marketing purposes.  Scopio's dashboards and workflow supported by solid technology cuts down on the social media content curation and rights management process time by as much as 70%.    The system has been piloted with multiple brands as well as news/media organizations like Reuters.  Chris Wiggins, professor at CU and Chief Data Scientist at NY Times gave it the tagline "Getty Images in real time".

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Manoj Pooleery

Manoj Pooleery

Chief Technology Officer, Scopio
Manoj Pooleery is a seasoned IT executive and Entrepreneur with 20 years of experience in Enterprise Architecture, Software development, Project and Program Management, teaching and mentoring. He specializes in Entrepreneurship, multi-year Strategy development, Budgeting, Technology... Read More →
avatar for Nour Chamoun

Nour Chamoun

Chief Creative Officer, Scopio
A graduate of the Design + Technology masters program at Parsons School of Design, Chamoun is currently the Chief Creative Officer at Scopio. Scopio is a high-tech social image agency. They streamline the copyright process for user generated images and videos. They are an image marketplace... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Sensing Using Thin Film Technologies [D30]
Thin film and printable electronics offer the opportunity for the development and fabrication of new electronic systems with a range of applications.  In this demo we will showcase three applications of thin film systems applied to sensor systems and data collection, namely:    -Flexible devices for strain and position sensing (with Peter Allen and Matei Ciocarlie)  -Flexible systems for optical imaging and analysis (with Hongtao Ma and Andreas Hielscher)  -Printed sensors for chemical and vapor sensing (with Howard Katz)    Demos will show these systems in operation, and students will be on hand to answer questions about their fabrication and application. 

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Ioannis (John) Kymissis

Ioannis (John) Kymissis

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Ioannis (John) Kymissis is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia Engineering. His area of specialization is solid state electronics and device fabrication. He researches thin film devices and systems, especially focusing on optoelectronic and sensing devices... Read More →
avatar for Kostas Alexandrou

Kostas Alexandrou

PhD Candidate in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Kostas Alexandrou received his B.S degree in Computer Engineering from the Piraeus University of Applied Sciences  in 2008. He continued his studies joining the international Master's in Nanotechnology, a joint degree from 3 European universities, finishing with a thesis at IBM Almaden... Read More →
SD

Simona Dalmasso

Columbia University
avatar for Youngwan Kim

Youngwan Kim

PhD Candidate in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Youngwan (Willis) Kim obtained his Dual B.S degree magna cum laude in Electrical Engineering from Kyungpook National University, Korea and University of Texas, Dallas in 2011. During his undergraduate studies, he worked as a circuit designer and system developer at Winitech (South... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
CY

Caroline Yu

Student, ELectrical Engineering, Columbia University

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Shuffler: Continuous Code Layout Randomization [D6]
Many programs are vulnerable to code-reuse attacks, where their own code is stitched together to form a malicious exploit (known as Return-Oriented Programming or ROP). Recently, Just-In-Time ROP attacks have been described which dynamically discover a target program's code, so even if it is randomized differently every time it runs, ROP can still be performed. We present Shuffler, the first comprehensive re-randomization technique that continuously changes the layout of code in memory as it runs. This process is self-hosting, and the code which implements the migration is itself re-randomized. Shuffler defines a time window -- as short as 100ms -- within which a ROP attacker must gather information, compile, and execute their exploit. This extra time dimension will confound most existing attacks.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for David Williams-King

David Williams-King

PhD Candidate in Computer Science, Columbia Engineering
David is a PhD student at Columbia University advised by Junfeng Yang, Simha Sethumadhavan, and Roxana Geambasu. His interests include security and operating systems, compilers, and speech recognition. He currently researches randomization-based techniques to defeat code reuse attacks... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Zheng

Michelle Zheng

Undergraduate Student in Computer Science and Economic, Columbia College
Michelle is an undergraduate student studying Computer Science and Economics.  She is assisting David Williams-King with his research project, the Shuffler. Michelle’s interests include security, compilers and 3-D user interface design. Michelle is graduating from Columbia College... Read More →



Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

SoleSound: A Gait Analysis Device with Tactile and Auditory Feedback [D15]
The SoleSound is a fully portable wearable system that consists of a pair of smart footwear units capable of measuring an individual’s gait characteristics and providing audio-tactile feedback to the wearer. A separate hip pack unit contains a single-board computer which stores the sensor data collected from the footwear units and processes that information in real time to synthesize feedback corresponding to the wearer’s movements.     Underfoot pressures are recorded by each footwear unit via four pressure sensors mounted below the insole. Kinematic data (orientation and linear acceleration) is collected from IMU units located within each footwear and on the user’s shanks. In addition, a side mounted ultrasonic sensor is used to estimate base of walking. Feedback is provided via five vibro-tactile transducers mounted in areas of the sole where density of mechanoreceptors is highest. Practical applications include diagnostic gait analysis for fall prevention and virtual reality simulation.  

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Damiano Zanotto

Damiano Zanotto

Associate Research Scientist in Mechanical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Damiano Zanotto received Bachelor' s and Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering in 2005 and 2007, respectively, as well as a Ph.D. degree in Industrial Engineering (curriculum in Mechatronics) in 2011, all from the University of Padua, in Padua, Italy. Between 2011 and 2013, he... Read More →
HZ

Huanghe Zhang

MS Student in Mechanical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
JX

Jesse Xing

MS Student in Mechanical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
avatar for Sunil Agrawal

Sunil Agrawal

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, Columbia Engineering
Dr. Agrawal obtained a PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 1990 with emphasis on robotics, dynamics, and control. He currently directs the Robotics and Rehabilitation Laboratory (ROAR) and Robotic Systems Engineering Laboratory (ROSE), which have... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Using Data Science to Generate Real-Time Blood Glucose Forecasts for Individuals with Diabetes [D18]
In this demo we will showcase a novel way to utilize data collected through self-monitoring to predict health impact of future actions. Diabetes is a chronic illness affecting nearly 10% of Americans, and requires multiple adjustments to diet, exercise, and other lifestyle choices. Yet anticipating the impact of these adjustments can be challenging for both individuals with diabetes and their caregivers. We have developed Mealyzer, a mobile application that facilitates diabetes self-management by providing users with real-time, personalized, physiology-based forecasts of blood glucose levels based on prospective meals. Users record their blood glucose and meals by submitting images and descriptive text, and subsequently receive short-term blood glucose predictions that are generated in a data assimilation framework that uses a dual unscented Kalman filter to personalize mechanistic models of the glucose-insulin system. In this demo, we will showcase the Mealyzer mobile interface, and visualization of the forecasts generated with computational models.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for David J. Albers

David J. Albers

Associate Research Scientist in Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons
David Albers is an Associate Research Scientist who earned his bachelor’s in mathematics and bachelor’s, master’s, and PhD degrees in physics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Experienced in nonlinear science and dynamical systems, Dr. Albers has recently aimed to... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Levine

Matthew Levine

Research Associate in Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons
Matthew Levine is a Research Associate in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University. His primary research interests focus on the temporal dynamics of biomedical data. Matthew’s recent work involves pairing mechanistic models with physiologic data, with a goal... Read More →
avatar for Olena Mamykina

Olena Mamykina

Assistant Professor of Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons
Olena Mamykina is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University. Her primary research interests reside in the areas of Biomedical Informatics, Human-Computer Interaction, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing, and... Read More →


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Visualizing Population Exposure to Hazards: The SEDAC Hazards Mapper and HazPop Mobile App [D25]
A growing array of data on natural hazards and population and infrastructure distribution is available online through open web mapping services. The Hazards Mapper and HazPop Mobile App enable users to visualize recent data on earthquakes, tornadoes, wildfires, and other hazards in relationship to population, settlements, and major infrastructure such as dams and power plants. Users are also able to perform spatial queries to determine the total population around an existing facility or within a user-defined circle or polygon. The mobile app, currently implemented for iPhones and tablets running iOS, utilizes location services to support additional query and alert functions. These tools, together with selected population and infrastructure data, are available through the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC), which is operated by the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), part of the Earth Institute at Columbia University.

Demo/Poster Presenter
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Elisabeth Sydor

Publications Coordinator, Earth Institute, Center for International Earth Science Information Network
avatar for Greg Yetman

Greg Yetman

Senior Staff Associate, Earth Institute, Center for International Earth Science Information Network
Greg Yetman is associate director for the Geospatial Applications Division at CIESIN. He is a geographer specializing in the application of geographic information system (GIS) technologies in applied and research fields, including population geography, natural disasters, and environmental... Read More →
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Joachim Schumacher

Senior Staff Associate, Earth Institute, Center for International Earth Science Information Network
avatar for Robert Chen

Robert Chen

Director & Senior Research Scientist, CIESIN/Columbia University
Environment and security applications, DANTE (Data ANalytics and Tools for Ecosecurity), the POPGRID Data Collaborative, TReNDS (Thematic Research Network on Data and Statistics), SEDAC (Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center), decision support, open data sharing (not just FAIR... Read More →
avatar for Sri Vinay

Sri Vinay

Senior Staff Associate, Earth Institute, Center for International Earth Science Information Network
Sri Vinay heads the Information Technology division at CIESIN. He is the systems engineer for the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC), a data center in NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System. His training is in electrical and computer engineering... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for Frank Pascuzzi

Frank Pascuzzi

Programmer Analyst, SEDAC
AP

Alfonse Pinto

Web Developer, CIESIN Columbia University


Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Wall Street meets FinTech: Interactive Visualization of Simulations of Systemic Financial Market Risk Conditional on Policy Interventions [D2]
A key issue for regulators and the banking and financial service industries is mitigating  systemic large-scale counterparty risk.  Currently, individual financial institutions and regulators conduct systemic risk exposure analysis using proprietary models and data protocols absent any agreed upon baseline, best practices or public scrutiny. Without industry standards, shared benchmarks, or means to validate results, the impact of alternative policy interventions on the overall risk in the financial system remains uncertain.    The demo will illustrate new open source analytical tools that     1) Develop highly granular trade and counterparty cross-asset class risk simulation;   2) Aggregate at the counterparty level; and  3) Explore systemic linkages and changes under policy intervention scenarios.    Bringing large-scale open source risk models to the public domain will enable a standard-based approach that facilitates research and greater understanding of the impact that policy levers have on the financial system.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Matthew Weber

Matthew Weber

Vice President UX and Design, Zoomdata
Matthew Weber is an award winning UX designer and executive, who has had his work showcased by Apple and has lectured at NASA. He has a passion for making data easy to use, and is currently VP of UX and Design at Zoomdata, as well as an associate at Columbia University. Matthew is... Read More →
avatar for Scott Sobolewski

Scott Sobolewski

Quaternion
Scott is a finance and risk professional specializing in capital planning, stress testing, and model development at large US banks. He advises financial institutions on risk management and regulatory compliance matters, helping clients accelerate model development and achieve high-value... Read More →
avatar for Sharyn O'Halloran

Sharyn O'Halloran

George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economy and Professor of International Affairs | Chief Academic Officer SPS, School of International and Public Affairs
Sharyn O'Halloran is the George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economy and Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University in New York City A political scientist and economist by training, O’Halloran has written extensively on issues related to the political... Read More →

Demo/Poster Collaborator
avatar for David K. Park

David K. Park

Dean of Strategic Initiatives / Director of Special Projects, Arts and Sciences
David K. Park is Dean of Strategic Initiatives and serves as a senior advisor to the Executive Vice President and Dean of Faculty of the Arts and Sciences at Columbia University. Dr. Park is a member of Columbia University's Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering New Media Center... Read More →

Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040

2:00pm EDT

Wireless Demonstrator with Analog-Enabled Digital MIMO Receivers for High Data Rate Wireless Communication [D27]
Wireless MIMO communication systems significantly improve data rate and data reliability with the spatial selectivity provided by multiple antennas and digital signal processing. However, the RF/analog circuits and data-converters in receivers are exposed to spatial interference due to the lack of spatial selectivity in analog domain.     In this wireless demonstrator, an 8-element spatio-spectral-filtering MIMO receiver array uses a 2×4 antenna array to detect a weak desired signal in the presence of a stronger spatially-distinct in-band blocker. 45 simultaneous beams in a 5×9 array are formed digitally. An image shows 45 pixels, the brightness of each indicates the received signal strength on a corresponding beam.     Without RF/analog spatial rejection, the receiver array outputs are saturated by the strong blocker. The desired signals cannot be detected on the image. With RF/analog spatial rejection, receiver saturation is prevented. The blocker disappears in the image and the desired weak signal can be clearly detected.

Demo/Poster Presenter
avatar for Linxiao Zhang

Linxiao Zhang

PhD Candidate in Electrical Engineering, Columbia Engineering
Linxiao Zhang graduated from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, in 2011 with a Bachelor's degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering. He interned at the Institute of Microelectronics, Singapore, for five months in 2009. In Summer 2012, he joined Dr. Harish Krishnaswamy's resea... Read More →



Wednesday April 6, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm EDT
Roone Arledge Auditorium Lerner Hall, Columbia University 2920 Broadway, New York, NY 10040